All posts tagged: weleda

Our skin needs food too

What we put on our skin should be good enough to eat. With our skin being the largest organ of our bodies and since it absorbs whatever you put on it – why should it be any different? A recent study shows that over 90% of people find it just as important to know what you put on your skin as what you eat. This is great news that we are thinking this way. Why? Because… A study for the American Journal of Public Health looked at the skin’s absorption rate of chemicals found in drinking water. They showed that it absorbed 64% of contaminants. Other research projects found the face to be several times more absorbent than larger, boarder body areas and that the underarms and genitalia were the most absorbent of all – taking in 100% of chemicals. Scary stuff. Skin Food Facials with my Global Garden sister, Phoebe. My Global Garden sister, Phoebe and I were lucky enough to be treated to a Skin Food Facial and hand massage by the team …

Ethics at work

This week I’ve been seeing new ways that Weleda lives up to their motto – ‘In harmony with nature and the human being.’ As I leave the Weleda France team in Huningue, I can’t help but reflect on my journey over the last two months. One thing that I see time and time again in each country is new ways that Weleda shows their commitment to treating humans and nature in a responsible and caring way. This week wasn’t all production and garden tours, I also visited two very special places at Weleda that I’d love to share with you. Weleda Crèche – ‘The Heart of Kids’ The human family is the center of Weleda, it comes naturally to them to want to meet the needs of parents and offer them a childcare option that adapted to their needs. Weleda decided to create its own nursery, not just for plants but for children too, near its headquarters in Huningue, in the Haut-Rhin. The crèche name means ‘heart of Kids’ and is designed in the shape …

Wandering the Weleda garden of Bouxwiller, France

If you want to be happy for a lifetime, be a gardener. Seems to be the case for Pierre Kappler, Head Gardener for Weleda France and Switzerland. He has worked in the 1.5 hectare biodynamic gardens in Bouxwiller, France for over 17 years. Pierre grew up in gardens. As a third-generation gardener, he grew up in a greenhouse operation and was even born in the farmhouse on the private garden he manages today. He completed his apprenticeship in biodynamic agriculture 17 years ago in collaboration with Weleda and the Goetheanum. 4 gardeners assist Pierre to tend the gardens where over 40-60 medicinal plants are grown. These are harvested in the morning then delivered to Weleda where the production laboratories process the plants by the afternoon. This is why Weleda has its own gardens. To make sure high quality raw materials are close to their production sites to guarantee the quality of the products. As we walked through the gardens I interviewed Pierre for a green gardening book that is in the pipeline. I enjoyed talking …

The human being at the heart of homeopathy

Learning about the unique homeopathy production in France with Jean-Michel Libion Weleda France has been making over 1200 prescription and over the counter medicines for more than 25 years – including granules, oils, creams, suppositories, ampules, oral drops, ointments, eye drops and injectable solutions. They are all produced in France in the Huningue laboratory through a mix of automation and human processes and are adapted to the individual needs of patients. The plant to production process Weleda’s approach to natural medicine remains the same today as it did in 1921  Jean-Michel, Dr. Pharmacy and Prescription Medicine Development Manager at Weleda France. He is a trained pharmacist who has worked at Weleda for over 30 years, the perfect person to show me around the Weleda laboratory and share what makes homeopathy in France so unique. There is a permanent search to find a balance between humans and nature – between what we can expect in terms of health and benefits and what nature can help us with. From the fields where the plants grow, the dynamisation of mother …

Nothing superficial here – Arlesheim, Switzerland

This week in Arlesheim, Switzerland team has taught me that nothing is superficial at Weleda – It’s with purpose. Or not at all. My week in Switzerland, the birthplace of Weleda and Anthroposophy – which helps guide the principles of Weleda, has helped me discover the deeper reasons behind why Weleda do the things they do. If it doesn’t work to strengthen the balance of the body, mind and spirit it has no place here. From people to plants to purpose – nothing happens by accident here. My wonderful guide the week was Christoph Lüthi. He has been with the company for many years and you would be hard pressed to find a person with more well-rounded knowledge of the Weleda products, philosophy and the region around Arlesheim, Switzerland. Anything I have learnt this week, I owe it to his calm explanations and wealth of wisdom. Where it all began Together we took a tour of the Goetheanum, built by Weleda’s founder, Rudolf Steiner, as a center for the anthroposophic movement and its various activities …

Ita Wegman Anthroposophic Clinic – The inside scoop from an inpatient

Who would have thought that I would actually be checking in – to check out the Dr Ita Wegman Anthroposophic Clinic in Arlesheim, Switzerland. My visit to the Ita Wegman Clinic came a day early. On Monday, I was scheduled to find out all about who Dr Ita Wegman was and why she set up the first anthroposophical medical clinic in Arlesheim in 1921. Nature decided I needed to visit a little earlier. I’ve been struggling with a chesty cough all week. But there’s far too many exciting things to be checking out in Switzerland rather than resting in bed. Turns out Bronchitis was here and wasn’t planning on leaving anytime soon. On the positive side, this allows me to share my newly found, first-hand knowledge of how the team at the clinic keep Ita Wegman’s approach to medicine going long after the medical pioneer had left the building. Who’s Ita Wegman? Ita Wegman 1876 – 1943 became a doctor in 1911, highly unusual for a woman at the time. Together with Rudolf Steiner they founded …

Anthroposophy – Where it began. And where to tomorrow?

I have landed in the world epi-centre of Anthroposophy – the Goetheanum in Dornach, Switzerland. The Goetheanum was created by Rudolph Steiner between 1913 and 1920 in Dornach, Switzerland – the birthplace to Anthroposophy. It was given this name in honor of German writer Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, whose works Steiner studied and revered. The Goetheanum was created as an active meeting place and performance centre for spiritually committed people. Today, over 150,000 people a year visit the home of the School of Spiritual Science and also the stage for over 800 events including lectures, exhibitions, theatre and eurhythmy performances and international conferences. Goetheanum is a place where spiritually minded people come to discuss approaches to mediative life, spiritual life-styles and to also develop themselves culturally. What a perfect place to discuss Anthroposophy with one of the world’s most qualified people on this topic – Paul Mackay, who until only recently was the former President of the Anthroposophical Society. Anthroposophy – Where it began. And where to tomorrow? Interview with Paul Mackay, the President of the …

Living life in ‘Lagom’ – Swedish for ‘Just the right amount’

Lagom is a Swedish word for ‘just the right amount’ – not too much, not too little, just right’ It’s the Swedish art of living a healthy balanced life. I’m halfway through my trip and I feel like I’m the Goldilocks of Global Garden – I finally feel like I’ve found my ‘just right’ – my balance. Sweden has been teaching me a lot this week about the importance of equality. And equilibrium. At the start of my journey my balance was way off… I’m the type of person who doesn’t want to miss a moment, especially on the trip of a lifetime. Or to not share all the new and exciting things I was learning with you guys either – I promised to be your eyes, your ears, your hands on this trip, I didn’t want you missing a moment either. I was writing to crazy hours of the morning and getting up soon after. But now I feel like I’m starting to hit my stride, my moderation, my balance. The Swedish art of …

Freedom to roam

Sweden believes its ‘Everyman’s right’ to enjoy nature. The ‘freedom to roam’ is the principle, protected by the law, that gives all people the right enjoy their natural environment. The north is mostly wilderness, foaming rivers, high alpine peaks and plains, while the south is rolling countryside and never-ending beaches. East lies Stockholm with its wondrous archipelago and the west is rocky coastline, islands and giant lakes. No wonder Swedes spend as much time as possible outdoors – most having rustic country cottages to helps them leave the week behind and escape into nature. Sweden – The land of the free Sweden is a country built on freedom and openness – the foundation for creating an equal society. Everyone has the right to take part in demonstrations, freedom of speech, free press, the right to challenge those in power as well as the openness to enjoy all areas of nature regardless of ownership. These healthy-living locals can have a cookout in the quiet forest, sleep on mountaintops, take a dip in the pristine the lakes, …

Bending the circle of life back into shape

Seeing new born nature at work with Natuurmonumenten – Holland’s largest nature conservation organization. Iwas lucky enough to join Hanne and José, two of 400 Natuurmonumenten forresters to visit the nature reserves in Pietersberg, Maastricht. Here, Weleda and Natuurmonumenten, are working together to restore nature. Sorry to share this statistic with you but only 15% of biodiversity is left in Holland. But this isn’t a sad story, if anything, the opposite. The wonky wheel doesn’t have to be the circle of life We know that we are doing some pretty damaging things to our planet. We’re a bit bent out of shape and we know we are not enjoying the smoothest of rides into the future. But what I am loving learning is it doesn’t take much to straighten ourselves out, and bend the circle of life into shape. Together we stood overlooking the perfect ‘before and after scenario’ of new born nature at work. To our left is the ENCI quarry which will be returned to Natuurmonumenten in 2020 and turned into limestone based nature. …