All posts tagged: biodynamic farming

The growing interest in ‘el natural’ lifestyle

Argentina has a history long associated with natural medicines. One that is only growing in popularity with so many Argentinian’s seeking out a more natural lifestyle. ‘People want to know where our raw materials come from.’ Stefan Niewind, Managing Director of Weleda Argentina. I went on a journey find out when the ingredients come from for you. To find this natural treasure trove I left the vibrant city of Buenos Aires 800 kilometres behind to visit Jorge Gusto – the manager of Weleda medicinal garden in the quiet mountains of Córdoba. ‘The soil in the Córdoba mountains is rich in quartz crystals which provide the plants with a lot of energy to grow.’ Jorge Gusto Jorge is the ‘green hands’ that tends the 3.5 hectares of land, 1280 meters above sea level. These gardens cultivate almost all of the plants Weleda needs for the manufacture of their anthroposophic pharmaceuticals and cosmetics in Buenos Aires. The gardens themselves are a picture of health. Bees are buzzing, the flowers are blooming, the birds are singing… ‘Here we …

New things. New Zealand.

This week I jumped over the side fence to hang out with the Weleda team in New Zealand. Whilst Aussies and Kiwi’s are neighbours, the Weleda experiences couldn’t have been more different. My week in Havelock North, Napier saw me getting my hands dirty in the Weleda biodynamic gardens. The same gardens where 80% of the active ingredients in their anthroposophical medicines are sourced. I also got hands-on in the lab seeing how the vitality of the garden produce gets potentized into tinctures then into the Weleda products themselves. Since I have started on the Global Garden journey my head hasn’t stopped spinning – so many exciting things are happening and I don’t want to miss a moment. After this week I’m feeling much more grounded, maybe having my hands in the soil has helped bring me back to earth. Here’s some of the ways I got my hands dirty The Global Garden sisterhood reunion has started. Simone Anderson, New Zealand’s inspirational finalist came to visit me in Hawke’s Bay. We had the honour of …

‘Horn Manure’ – Is it a load of bull?

Hear me out then feel 100% free to make up your own mind. Stuffing cow horns with manure and burying in a pit for 6 months may sound little woo-woo to some. But the rich compost that comes from it is the foundation for biodynamic farming. When did Biodynamic farming come about?  Steiner developed the Biodynamic farming principles in 1924 in response to farmers requests for his thinking about the declining quality of their produce and yield of crops. His biodynamic philosophy was his way of improving the stability and richness of the soil by enhancing its organic matter, by avoiding synthetic fertilizers, herbicides and pesticides – to give the produce back its vitality. Ok, we are all keeping up with that. Where we may lose a few people is that he also claimed that “cosmic vital forces” have a large impact on plants and animals. He recommended processes of using cow horns as vessels to vitalize the soil. The process goes a little like this. Cow horns are filled with manure (this is called …

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Top five things I learnt from Weleda Australia

Question everything. Learn Something. Answer nothing. T his is the first thing I learnt in my first week of the Global Garden journey. It’s been full of thought provoking experiences. I have asked a million questions and have learnt so much. ‘Don’t worry, there’s no chance that after one week I’m professing to be a ‘guru’ with all the answers. But I did want to share my top five learnings from  my week in Sydney, Australia.’ Some of the ground we have covered this week Sowing seeds and taking Biodynamics at Warrah Farm Building a Bee Hotel with Alison from Bee-cology as part of the Weleda Bee B&B school program Detoxing the beauty bag in an Eco Make Up Masterclass Celebrating our oceans and Project Aware’s milestone of removing 1 million pieces of debris from our ocean floor Learning to get my Leica camera off auto-mode with Photo Workshop Australia Sydney in a snap shot What is biodynamic farming, and how is it different to organic? Biodynamic gardening is the next step to organic farming. …

Healthy soil. Healthy people. 

Biodynamics 101 Biodynamics is a massive topic, one very hard to distil down. I asked Rob from The Warrah Society Biodynamic Farm to give me the simple low down. The Global Garden journey will give us lots of opportunities for a deeper understanding of Biodynamics, but for now let’s start at the start. In 1924, German farmers came to the founder of Weleda, Rudolf Steiner with their concerns about increasing use of chemicals deteriorating the quality of their soil. The philosophies Steiner shared with them during this time became the principles of Biodynamic farming that are so popular today. These principles are fundamentally very simple. ‘Less chemicals going into the earth means less chemicals going into human beings.’ What is Biodynamic farming? Biodynamics is a farm-forward approach to healing the planet through conscious agriculture. It’s about nature helping nature by taking the art of farming and enriching it with a philosophical and spiritual meaning. With the purpose to create ecological, social, and economic sustainability. ‘Biodynamic farming is much more than a method, it is a …