All posts tagged: agriculture

Car park to care crop at FICO

Fico Eataly World is the largest agri-food park in the world. Even the original car park is green, being transformed from a concrete jungle into a biodynamic meadow. FICO, in Bologna Italy is an interactive, experiential center that teaches us of all ages about food and biodiversity. I was very lucky to have Carlo Triarico, President of the Association for Biodynamic Agriculture in Italy as my private teacher. Carlo works to help biodynamic farms and the health of all other farms. As we walked past the food and produce stalls of local eco artisans, Carlo explained his involvement in this complex that was designed to create a way for all generations to connect with the food we eat and where it comes from in our agricultural world. Why is biodynamics so important to you? “It is the first form of biodynamic agriculture. It’s from the very beginning, over one century old. Yet it is modern. It’s the agriculture of today too. We need it.” Carlo Triarico The meadows are currently under construction but the future …

New things. New Zealand.

This week I jumped over the side fence to hang out with the Weleda team in New Zealand. Whilst Aussies and Kiwi’s are neighbours, the Weleda experiences couldn’t have been more different. My week in Havelock North, Napier saw me getting my hands dirty in the Weleda biodynamic gardens. The same gardens where 80% of the active ingredients in their anthroposophical medicines are sourced. I also got hands-on in the lab seeing how the vitality of the garden produce gets potentized into tinctures then into the Weleda products themselves. Since I have started on the Global Garden journey my head hasn’t stopped spinning – so many exciting things are happening and I don’t want to miss a moment. After this week I’m feeling much more grounded, maybe having my hands in the soil has helped bring me back to earth. Here’s some of the ways I got my hands dirty The Global Garden sisterhood reunion has started. Simone Anderson, New Zealand’s inspirational finalist came to visit me in Hawke’s Bay. We had the honour of …

‘Horn Manure’ – Is it a load of bull?

Hear me out then feel 100% free to make up your own mind. Stuffing cow horns with manure and burying in a pit for 6 months may sound little woo-woo to some. But the rich compost that comes from it is the foundation for biodynamic farming. When did Biodynamic farming come about?  Steiner developed the Biodynamic farming principles in 1924 in response to farmers requests for his thinking about the declining quality of their produce and yield of crops. His biodynamic philosophy was his way of improving the stability and richness of the soil by enhancing its organic matter, by avoiding synthetic fertilizers, herbicides and pesticides – to give the produce back its vitality. Ok, we are all keeping up with that. Where we may lose a few people is that he also claimed that “cosmic vital forces” have a large impact on plants and animals. He recommended processes of using cow horns as vessels to vitalize the soil. The process goes a little like this. Cow horns are filled with manure (this is called …